150+ Free Legal Resources for Start-ups

This is a giant list of 150+ free legal and law-related resources for Canadian start-ups and entrepreneurs. Look below for links to free business law guides, contract templates, student-run business law clinics, as well as online information boards. If you notice a link missing, please contact me here.

Giant list of free legal templates and resources for Canadian startups and entrepreneurs
There are tons of free law-related templates, guides, and information sources for Canadian start-ups online.

Free business law guides

These guides outline general information for businesses in Canada, written by some of the largest Canadian law firms. Some tend to be quite lengthy, but they’re a good primer on issues that may affect your business.

Canada

Alberta

British Columbia

Manitoba

New Brunswick

Newfoundland & Labrador

Northwest Territories

Nova Scotia

Nunavut

Ontario

Prince Edward Island (PEI)

Quebec

Yukon

Free contract templates

Few lawyers draft contracts from scratch; contract templates can provide a helpful framework to build off of. However, you should not use these templates without speaking to a lawyer. Templates may not cover your business’s specific situation. Use them with discretion.

Canada

Ontario

Business law clinics for start-ups

If you’re a student or starting a new business with minimal revenue, you may qualify for free legal advice at a student clinic. These are some business-focused legal aid clinics started by law faculties across Canada.

Canada

Alberta

British Columbia

Manitoba

Nova Scotia

Ontario

Quebec

Online legal Q&A, FAQ and information

Sometimes, you just need help understanding a single regulation or step in a proceeding. It may not seem like enough to talk to a lawyer about (although you still should if you can), so you can look for the answer online. What follows are a few online Q&A and FAQ boards that you may find helpful.

Canada

Alberta

British Columbia

Manitoba

New Brunswick

Nova Scotia

Ontario

Quebec

Saskatchewan

  • PLEA, “Legal information for everyone”

Other free legal resources (not business-focused)

When it comes to legal issues beyond your business (like law suits, immigration, criminal, and landlord/tenant matters), check out the following low-cost resources across Canada.

Canada

Alberta

British Columbia

Manitoba

New Brunswick

Newfoundland & Labrador

Northwest Territories

  • Legal Aid (Yellowknife, NWT): “confidential legal services, advice, and representation by a lawyer for residents of the Northwest Territories who would be unable to afford these services.”

Nova Scotia

  • Dalhousie Legal Aid Service (Halifax, NS): provides “legal aid services for persons who would not otherwise be able to obtain legal advice for assistance.”
  • Legal Aid Nova Scotia: “delivers legal aid via a network of 16 community-based law offices as well as 3 sub-offices.”
  • Mi’kmaq Legal Support Network: “justice support system for Aboriginal people who are involved in the criminal justice system in Nova Scotia.”
  • Newcomers to Canada: free information about “criminal law, domestic violence law, family law, general law, human rights & immigration status”
  • reachAbility: Lawyer referral service for persons with disabilities.

Nunavut

  • Legal Services Board of Nunavut “responsible for providing legal services to financially eligible Nunavummiut in the areas of criminal, family and civil law.”

Ontario

Prince Edward Island

Quebec

  • Pro Bono Quebec: public interest cases, partnerships, duty counsel and information.

Saskatchewan

Yukon

Design Firms Do Conferences Differently: FITC Toronto 2015

This past Sunday, April 12 through Tuesday, April 14, Toronto hosted the 14th annual Future Innovation Technology Creativity (FITC) conference. Now in its 14th year, FITC caters to a more design-heavy technology group, featuring equal parts technical workshops, wild parties and inspirational talks. I was able to attend the event as an “official blogger,” or volunteer media personnel. I really enjoyed the introduction to the world of design and digital art–the people who make tech beautiful and easy to use.

Why was I there? I wanted to learn more about creative firms and the challenges they face, because I’d like to have creative agencies as clients one day. If I learned one thing, it’s that a traditional legal marketing approach (focusing on expertise, stuffy speeches and pinstripe suits) is completely foreign to people in the design community. The experiences they share are more raw and honest.

When I arrived at FITC, I noticed right away how different it was from an ordinary conference. The design-conscious organizers made the Hilton’s basement conference zone look like a rock concert. Party lighting brought some energy to the otherwise neutral hotel concourse. The dress code was casual but stylish. Mohawks were not uncommon. Attendees included coders, designers, artists, and entrepreneurs, and they were all friendly.

FITC’s 14 years of success showed. The event ran like clockwork, with large teams of volunteers registering, ushering, collecting feedback, and directing the day. In particular it was nice to see breakout rooms for sketching, dancing and creative pursuits. FITC isn’t all about sitting down and listening–it was more like a supportive community coming together to share lessons, jobs, tools, and good times.

As part of my role, I got to cover a few specific talks:

  • Gavin Strange, Bristol UK-based animator for Wallace & Grommet’s creator Aardman, talked about pushing boundaries with “one-nighter” projects and new media.
  • Shawn Pucknell, FITC’s CEO spoke candidly about bankruptcy, failure, and how to survive.
  • Kim Alpert, a creative strategist and artist, talked about breaking through limits and refusing to be defined by anyone’s expectations.
  • Finally, I learned about Flickr’s ongoing growth and transformation following its acquisition by Yahoo. It was a great story about shifting competitive landscapes and leadership.

For anyone interested in design, technology or startups, I highly recommend connecting with the FITC community. Ideally I’d like to attend next year as a volunteer again or a speaker. If I do, one thing is for sure: a standard legal precedent walk-through won’t cut it.

Finally, big thanks to the FITC organizers for inviting me as an official blogger this year, it was a great experience.

What Law Students Missed at #LegalLean Toronto

Legal innovation was brewing at the MaRS Discovery District this past Saturday, February 21st, 2015 at Toronto’s #LegalLean event. Over 70 attendees arrived to participate in “unconference” sessions moderated by MaRS’s Aron Solomon and Cognition LLP’s Jason Moyse.

The main purpose of the event: surveying the legal innovation landscape, with a focus on applying “lean” (waste-cutting and value-adding) principles to legal services.  The event played out in both real-time and on Twitter.

As a recent graduate, I couldn’t help but notice that there were not many law students at the event. The strongest law school turnout was from Michigan State University (MSU)’s ReInvent Law Laboratory. The sessions that followed were a glimpse at the legal landscape law students will soon find themselves in. This article is a quick summary of what law students missed: the people, the ideas, and the inspiration.

MaRS Discovery District

Who was there?

The only thing more important than the ideas discussed at the unconference were the people and interests represented there. If there was one thing law students missed at #LegalLean, it was the chance to meet and network with people who are solving tomorrow’s legal challenges.

The #LegalLean session leaders included Seyfarth Shaw LLP’s Ken Grady, Proskauer e-Discovery’s Dera Nevin, and Clio’s Joshua Lenon. If law students haven’t heard about new-model law firms, e-discovery services, or cloud-based practice management platforms, Ken, Dera, and Josh provided great introductions. (For anyone looking for more resources on these topics, reach out in the comments or through my contact form and I’ll send suggestions.)

The keynote speech was delivered by Mitch Kowalski, author of Avoiding Extinction: Reimagining Legal Services for the 21st Century. Mitch’s book should be required reading in law school. It was an eye-opener for me when I first read it, as a novella-style description of what law firms might look like one day. Other legal celebrities present included Peter Carayiannis, founder of Conduit Law and the Editor-in-Chief of the Canadian Lawyer family of publications Gail J. Cohen. The ROSS founders were also there, the entrepreneurs using IBM’s Watson to perform legal research.

As for the audience, a show of hands revealed that about 70% were lawyers, 15% entrepreneurs, and 15% non-legal:

If you didn’t get a chance to go and would like a survey of the people who were there, the Twitter feed #LegalLean shows who was tweeting during the event.

Why was it special?

The #LegalLean conference featured some powerful ideas:

  • The way the event was organized “unconference style” meant that people off-site could follow along via the Twitter hashtag feed. Although not as participant-driven as it could have been, audience members could still tweet favourite quotes and moments from the conference. Particularly diligent attendees like Knowledge Management Consultant Connie Crosby helped create a written record of the presentations in digestible 140-character snippets. This isn’t a new trend, but it set the theme for the day. Conferences used to be done the same way legal advice was—advice would be thrown out into the audience and lost unless someone made it available on paper. Not any more. #LegalLean was captured on video, by live tweet, and through post-event blog articles like this one.
  • In a similar vein, Dera Nevin’s talk described that the main sticking point for legal innovation was the lack of categorization. Our transition from unstructured legal “stories” to structured searchable data has been painfully slow. Why are our judicial decisions still written in prose? Why are they not broken down by independent and dependent variable? Better data would allow better predictions, more certainty, and easier legal compliance. Law students should think about how they are capturing data at their future firms. Are they creating organizational learning, or forcing someone else to repeat the same work in the future?
  • Legal advice tends to be equally unstructured. Ken Grady described his visits to law firms all over the world, where he would ask for the likelihood of success on trademark litigation. The answer would invariably be “about 50/50.” Better data capture and processes in law firms should allow more accurate predictions. As lawyers, we need to step out of the grey and add value by providing more certainty for our clients.
  • Certainty and consistency brings us to one of the main ideas at #LegalLean. Jayson Moyse described “lean six sigma” as reducing the manufacturing process error rate below 3.4 defects per one million occurrences. That is an incredible achievement for manufacturing firms, often demanded in high-risk, high-value industries like aerospace. What if we brought that level of certainty to law? Through lean processes (a waste-cutting and value-adding discipline) it could be possible.

For a broader survey of the moments and ideas expressed at #LegalLean, the Canadian Lawyer published a tweet stream summary, and David Curle from Thomson Reuters published an excellent report here.

What was inspirational?

The people and ideas at #LegalLean were no doubt engaging. The best part was the inspiration. Law students and recent graduates like myself would have left the day feeling like we were entering world of opportunity. While walking down College Street in the snow, I couldn’t help but feel like it is the perfect time to be in (or graduating from) law school.

Right here in Toronto, there are groups working to make legal services more accessible, more predictable, and more useful for clients. Venture capital investment in legal startups is heating up.

Innovation centers like MaRS in Toronto and Communitech in Waterloo are close at hand. Exciting ventures like the IBM-Watson powered ROSS are evidence that beyond-the-edge legal startups can be created in Toronto. The legal innovation culture in Canada is still nascent. We don’t yet have institutions preaching this methodology, although Lakehead’s new law school is challenging the status quo, and the LPP program is changing the way lawyers are educated. 

We ended the event with an open Q&A. I asked the audience what inspired them about the conference; what idea they planned to take action on. The only answer from the crowd was an American law student from Michigan’s ReInvent Law Program. I think that speaks volumes.

Personally I’d like to see Canada lead the North American legal innovation sector. I didn’t get a chance to share my own inspiration from the event, but ask me and I’ll tell you. I came away from #LegalLean thinking differently, and I’m planning on shaking up the legal industry in my own way over the next few years.

Please get in touch if you’d like to share ideas, ask questions or collaborate. Thanks for reading.

#LegalLean Photo Gallery

TEAMwork: Interdisciplinary Learning at its Finest

April 1st 2013 marks the end of my eight-month experience in the Technology Engineering And Management (TEAM) course at Queen’s University.

Every law school should have a course like TEAM.  It allows law students to work with engineering and management students, and trains legal minds to look for ways they can add value in real-world projects.

2013-02-15 17.15.57

What is TEAM?

TEAM is an interdisciplinary project course.  Senior students enrol in the course from chemical engineering, commerce, and law.  Each student begins the term by bidding on projects proposed by industry partners across Canada and the United States.

Students are matched to projects based on their interest and experience.  Teams of 3-5 students are formed for each project.  The TEAM class runs anywhere from 18 to 20 projects a year.

Former projects have included the retrofit of a manufacturing plant, innovative carbon capture processes, feasibility of a new oil pipeline upgrader design, geothermal energy production, and environmentally friendly oil sands worker housing.

How did TEAM start?

The TEAM course was designed by Barrie Jackson , an ex-Shell employee and Queen’s Adjunct Associate Professor, in 1995.  He realized that engineers never work in isolation, and should learn the business and legal side of their work.

TEAM’s great work continues thanks to the tireless efforts of Dave Mody, an Adjunct Lecturer and “Engineer in Residence” at the Chemical Engineering Faculty at Queen’s.  Dave meets with student teams weekly to guide and mentor student groups, and to share his 17 years of engineering and design process experience.

What was my experience like?

I was lucky to be matched with a fantastic client known in the energy industry worldwide.  Their head office in Canada is in Calgary, so our team was flown out to get briefed on our project in November 2012.  Next week, on April 2nd we’ll present our final presentation and report.

Our project is a concept design for an environmentally, socially, and economically sustainable remote housing unit for resource development workers.  We had a few different personality types and learning styles on our team.  It was a great leadership experience.

Have you ever had an interdisciplinary project that inspired you, or taught you things you didn’t expect?  Post it in the comments.

The legal angle of my project was on the aboriginal consultation requirements, and the environmental-regulatory requirements for an energy development project.  The nature of the project touched many areas of law, and it’s an experience I’ll never forget.

 

The Words We Use to Talk About Law

Using the free online web tool Wordle.net, I generated word clouds from two very different Canadian legal-themed blogs (one similarity: they are both excellent).  It makes me think about the words I use most frequently to share my perspective on legal issues and the law.

What are yours?

Various Legal Words from Slaw dot CA

^inspired by http://slaw.ca (generated using http://wordle.net)

Word cloud of terms from the court dot ca

^inspired by http://thecourt.ca (image generated using http://wordle.net)